Workout

Any amount of running linked to significantly lower risk of early death

Any amount of running is linked to a significantly lower risk of death from any cause, finds a pooled analysis of the available evidence, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

If more people took up running – and they wouldn’t have to run far or fast – there would likely be substantial improvements in population health and longevity, conclude the researchers.

It’s not clear how good running is for staving off the risk of death from any cause and particularly from cardiovascular disease and cancer, say the researchers. Nor is it clear how much running a person needs to do to reap these potential benefits, nor whether upping the frequency, duration, and pace — in other words, increasing the ‘dose’ — might be even more advantageous.

To try and find out, the researchers systematically reviewed relevant published research, conference presentations, and doctoral theses and dissertations in a broad range of academic databases.

They looked for studies on the association between running/jogging and the risk of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

They found 14 suitable studies, involving 232,149 people, whose health had been tracked for between 5.5 and 35 years. During this time, 25,951 of the study participants died.

When the study data were pooled, any amount of running was associated with a 27% lower risk of death from all causes for both sexes, compared with no running. It was also associated with a 30% lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and a 23% lower risk of death from cancer.

Even small ‘doses’ – for example, once weekly or less, lasting less than 50 minutes each time, and at a speed below 6 miles (8 km) an hour, still seemed to be associated with significant health/longevity benefits.

Check the full story.

Source: ScienceDaily

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) Reverses Aging

The Mayo Clinic has determined that intense aerobic exercise has the potential to reverse the aging process in adults. Though everyone knows exercise is beneficial, there are plenty of questions regarding which types of exercises are the best and what age groups benefit the most from specific exercises. According to the Mayo Clinic, high intensity cardio can reverse some cellular aspects of aging.

The Study’s Aim

The purpose of the study described above was to pinpoint evidence that would assist in the development of exercise recommendations and targeted therapies for people of varying ages. Researchers monitored molecular and metabolic alterations in individuals of varying ages across a period of about three months. They collected data 72 hours after those in randomized groups performed an array of different exercises.

Study Details

Mayo Clinic researchers tested high-intensity interval training (HIIT) against combined training and resistance training. Each style of training boosted lean body mass as well as insulin sensitivity. However, HIIT and combined training heightened aerobic capacity as well as mitochondrial functionality for skeletal muscle. This is especially important for senior citizens who often endure declines in mitochondrial content and functionality.

HIIT even boosted muscle protein content that improved energetic functions and spurred the enlargement of muscles. This bolstering of muscle protein was common in older adults who engaged in high-intensity intervals. The research team keyed in on one of their most important findings: exercise boosted the cellular machinery necessary for the construction of new proteins. Protein creation and synthesis reverse some of the problematic effects of the aging process.

The take-home message is that HIIT is ideal for aging adults as it benefits the body at the molecular level as well as metabolically. HIIT reverses certain manifestations of the aging process within the human body’s protein function. Engaging in resistance training is also advisable as it allows for the establishment of considerable muscle strength. HIIT is certainly beneficial yet a strict reliance on this style of exercise won’t significantly boost muscle strength unless combined with resistance training.

Check the full story.

Source: WorldHealth.net

Workout (M): Weekend Challenge – Card Shuffle

Workout.ExerciseDictIntroduction

  • This is a full body routine that uses a deck of cards (52 cards) to determine the exercises. This brings a lot of variety to the workout. ‘Which will be the next exercise?’, you will wonder.
  • It is basically a strength routine, but if you keep the rest time between exercises to a minimum, the cardio effect will also be great.
  • Bodyweight exercises only.
  • Workout Structure: Card Shuffle.
  • Have fun and good luck!

Click here for complete details (Member).


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Workout: Upper PT Ladder

Workout.ExerciseDictIntroduction

  • This is an upper body routine that includes bodyweight exercises.
  • It is a tough routine – you will significantly improve your upper body strength.
  • Workout Structure: Ladder.
  • Have fun and good luck!

Exercises

  • Pullups, Ladder Level (“LL”) X 1
  • Pushups, LL X 2
  • Let Me Ins, LL X 2
  • Dips, LL X 1

Explanation

Perform the routine in the following manner:

  • You start the ladder on level 1.
  • Do 1 x 1 Pullup, i.e. 1 Pullup.
  • 1 x 2 Pushups = 2 Pushups.
  • 1 x 2 Let Me Ins = 2.
  • 1 x 1 Dips = 1.
  • That was the first level, move on to level 2.
  • Do 2 x 1 Pullups = 2.
  • And so on, until you max out on the Pullups.
  • Then you go down the ladder one step at a time until you are back at level 1.
  • Well done!

Workout (M, 101): Lower Body PT #HIIT

Workout.ExerciseDictIntroduction

  • This is a lower body routine that includes bodyweight exercises.
  • The routine is of the High-Intensity-Interval-Training type.
  • You will gain lower body strength as well as improve your cardio respiratory fitness.
  • Workout Structure: Tabatas.
  • Have fun and good luck!

Exercises

Click here for complete details (Member).

Workout (M): Weekend Challenge – Card Shuffle

Workout.ExerciseDictIntroduction

  • This is a full body routine that uses a deck of cards (52 cards) to determine the exercises. This brings a lot of variety to the workout. ‘Which will be the next exercise?’, you will wonder.
  • It is basically a strength routine, but if you keep the rest time between exercises to a minimum, the cardio effect will also be great.
  • Bodyweight exercises only.
  • Workout Structure: Card Shuffle.

Click here for complete details (Member).